Project Tanzania

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Project Tanzania

Join the fight against malaria! End Malaria Now and Miss Tanzania have together to continue the fight against malaria in Tanzania. Project Tanzania will focus on providing insecticide-treated bed nets to those most in need throughout Tanzania in 2018. Tanzania has the third largest population at risk of malaria in Africa: over 90% of the population live in areas where there is malaria. Each year, 10 to 12 million people contract malaria in Tanzania and 80,000 dies from disease, most of them children. Lylian Muttakyawa, Miss Tanzania, was inspired to partner with us for this project in order to give back to her home country and those who were less fortunate than herself. The goal is to provide 5,000 bed nets to the people of Tanzania by 2018! For only $10 you can help provide a bed net for someone in need. Join our vision of a world free of malaria, donate today!

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Malaria and Mortality

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Malaria and Mortality

MEDIGO strives to improve access to healthcare on a global scale, and recently produced this following infographic projecting the development of global health over the next 14 years. As shown below, malaria is expected to have a 31% decrease in deaths by the year 2030. 

To see the blog on the Medigo Website, please click here

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Making a Difference: Beyond Bed Nets

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Making a Difference: Beyond Bed Nets

End Malaria Now is changing the way we approach making a difference. Not only are we providing prevention strategies to end the spread of malaria, but we hope to expand our efforts in spreading awareness while providing the opportunity to change people's lives. 

Lennox Ogada is a student artist from Kenya, whom our CFO Denise Tran met during a previous bed net distribution trip to Kenya. Through our new engagement program, L^3 (Life, Learning, Leadership), Denise has commissioned Lennox to create promotional materials geared towards educating and engaging children in creative ways. With fun comic book characters and coloring books, we hope to promote Lennox's talent, while building an appropriate venue for children and adults alike to learn about malaria.  In return for his talent and artwork, we have sponsored Lennox by providing him with resources, art supplies, and payment for school fees, to help bring him closer to his dream of becoming a professional artist.

 

         Flyer designed by Lennox featuring a fictional superhero, nicknamed "Bednet Barry".

         Flyer designed by Lennox featuring a fictional superhero, nicknamed "Bednet Barry".

To see a gallery of Lennox's other artwork, please click here.

 

LENNOX OGADA OCHIENG

Name: Lennox Ogada Ochieng

Born: May 5th, 1998 in Malindi, Kenya

As the son of an artist Mr. David Ochieng, Lennox grew up with the techniques of painting. He was at the age of 7 when he began to make art. Lennox was largely self-taught, but he did attend classes for a short period of time at the suggestion of his father. He initially studied in Kenya at Progressive High, then later went on to work with Mr. David Ochieng before setting up on his own as an artist in 2013.

While still in school, Lennox was drawn to impressionist painting. Since 2014, influenced by Mr. Ralph, a German architect, he turned to applied art and produced works in ornate styes before arriving at a simpler, rectilinear and functional style around 2015. He later started training as a portrait painter. In 2016, Lennox was engaged by a famous artist, Onesmus Odumbe to work at Nakumatt, which was his first opportunity for exhibition and marketing. Again introducing his techniques in art, many considered Lennox a young, famous artist in realistic painting.

While apprenticed through books, Lennox also became acquainted with symbolism. In 2016, he came under the influence of Shujaaz FM and became a book illustrator, and at once he illustrated more than 5 books. Around that time, he was also introduced to the CEO of End Malaria Now, Denise Tran, who has now commissioned him with the illustration of works based on the effects of malaria.  He voluntarily accepted the position as he was predestined by his artist background for a career as a graphic artist. He was promised scholarship, and his friendship with the organization has prompted him to turn his attention into the nonprofit field. 

 

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Malaria Update

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Malaria Update

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), in 2015 there were 214 million reported cases of malaria worldwide – this represents a 37% decline in incidence and a 60% reduction in mortality since 2000. These improvements were due to several factors, some of which are: the use of insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs), introduction of rapid diagnostics tests, access to anti-malarials, and improvement in sanitation.

In the last 15 years, more than a billion ITNs have been distributed in Africa benefiting the most vulnerable – children under the age of five. In 2015, 68% of under-fives were reported to sleep under an ITN resulting in the under-5 global malaria death rate to fall by 65 percent.

A 2007 study by Fegan et al.1 indicated that usage of an ITN was associated with a drop in mortality risk of 44 per cent. A more recent publication by Demombynes and Trommlerova2 , using data from not only small-scale controlled intervention efforts, but also from large-scale projects implemented by the government, draws a correlation between ITNs and the decline in infant mortality of up to 79% in Kenya.

But, this impressive and unimaginable achievement notwithstanding, more than 400,000 people worldwide, >70% kids under 5, still die from malaria each year, with most deaths occurring in sub-Saharan Africa.

Free distribution of ITNs by government and private campaigns have been proven to be the most effective way of providing vulnerable households with these lifesaving tools. Surveys have shown that most households with access to an ITN use it, and the biggest obstacle to using an ITN was lack of access to it. The WHO has recommended one ITN per two people in every household. In 2015, at least 41 million children under-5 in subSaharan Africa did not sleep under an ITN. There is a clear need for continued effort to ensure universal access to ITNs.

Team End Malaria Now (EMN) is dedicated to fighting this entirely preventable and treatable disease with your support. EMN Project Kenya was able to raise funds to buy 10,000 ITNs, which were distributed in orphanages, boarding schools, and elderly homes throughout Kenya. Our goal for next year is to raise funds for 20,000 ITNs to be distributed in Rwanda and Sierra Leone.

EMN will be able to achieve this with your help!

Join the EMN community of supporters who make a difference by saving lives and helping children live up to their full potential. EMN harnesses the giving potential in people, just like you, who raise awareness and funds in their respective communities through tools, resources, and inspiration provided by Team EMN. Start your own chapter of EMN by hosting a fundraiser at your next social event, school, or community center. Contact us for more information on how to organize a fundraiser, maximize your End Malaria Now Richa Chaturvedi February 17, 2016 fundraising efforts, get online access to your own Team EMN email center and Web page, and get logo stickers and banners to give your event a polished, recognizable look.

1 Lancet 370, 1035–1039

2 Economics and Human Biology 21 (2016) 17–32

 

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